Showing posts tagged books
via fullbloom and realkidsgoodbooks:
Mao Fujimoto, a student at the prestigious Tama Arts University, has redesigned the children’s fairytale, adding another dimension of true interactivity. Big Book is precisely that – a children’s story that unfolds into a gigantic single sheet, revealing an oversized graphic of something central to the story. Fujimoto was inspired by a keen fascination about what it would be like to ride on the turtle, which carries the young fisherman to a sub-sea palace in Urashima Taro, one of Japan’s most beloved stories. (via Big Book by Mao Fujimoto | Spoon & Tamago)

via fullbloom and realkidsgoodbooks:

Mao Fujimoto, a student at the prestigious Tama Arts University, has redesigned the children’s fairytale, adding another dimension of true interactivity. Big Book is precisely that – a children’s story that unfolds into a gigantic single sheet, revealing an oversized graphic of something central to the story. Fujimoto was inspired by a keen fascination about what it would be like to ride on the turtle, which carries the young fisherman to a sub-sea palace in Urashima Taro, one of Japan’s most beloved stories. (via Big Book by Mao Fujimoto | Spoon & Tamago)



Oh GOODY!!

Seven lost Dr. Seuss stories will be published in September by Random House.

Photo: Theodor Geisel — Dr. Seuss — at work in an undated photo.
Credit: Masterson Productions
via latimes



(Reblogged from latimes)
realkidsgoodbooks:

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie, art by Ellen Forney

This book changed how I felt about kid’s lit. This is definitely not your typical Stuart Little type of story. Read a bit for yourself.
EXCERPT
I was born with water on the brain.
Okay, so that’s not exactly true. I was actually born with too much cerebral spinal fluid inside my brain…My brain was drowning in grease. 
But that makes the whole thing sound wierdo and funny, like my brain was a giant French fry, so it seems more serious and poetic and accurate to say, “I was born with water on the brain.”
Okay, so maybe that’s not a very serious way to say it, either. Maybe the whole thing is weird and funny. 
But jeez, did my mother and father and big sister and grandma and cousins and aunts and uncles think it was funny when the doctors cut open my little skull and sucked out all the extra water with some tiny vacuum? 
I was only six months old and I was supposed to croak during the surgery. And even if I somehow survived the mini-Hoover, I was supposed to suffer serious brain damage during the procedure and live the rest of my life as a vegetable. 
Well, obviously I survived the surgery. I wouldn’t be writing this if I didn’t, but I have all sorts of physical problems that are directly the result of my brain damage…
My brain damage left me nearsighted in one eye and farsighted in the other, so my ugly glasses were all lopsided because my eyes were so lopsided. 
I got headaches because my eyes, are like, enemies, you know, like they used to be married to each other but now hate each other’s guts. 
And I started wearing glasses when I was three, so I ran around the rez looking like a three-year-old Indian grandpa. 
And, oh, I was skinny. I’d turn sideways and disappear.
But my hands and feet were huge. My feet were a size eleven in third grade! With my big feet and pencil body, I looked like a capital L walking down the road. 
And my skull was enormous.
Epic.

realkidsgoodbooks:

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie, art by Ellen Forney

This book changed how I felt about kid’s lit. This is definitely not your typical Stuart Little type of story. Read a bit for yourself.

EXCERPT

I was born with water on the brain.

Okay, so that’s not exactly true. I was actually born with too much cerebral spinal fluid inside my brain…My brain was drowning in grease. 

But that makes the whole thing sound wierdo and funny, like my brain was a giant French fry, so it seems more serious and poetic and accurate to say, “I was born with water on the brain.”

Okay, so maybe that’s not a very serious way to say it, either. Maybe the whole thing is weird and funny. 

But jeez, did my mother and father and big sister and grandma and cousins and aunts and uncles think it was funny when the doctors cut open my little skull and sucked out all the extra water with some tiny vacuum? 

I was only six months old and I was supposed to croak during the surgery. And even if I somehow survived the mini-Hoover, I was supposed to suffer serious brain damage during the procedure and live the rest of my life as a vegetable. 

Well, obviously I survived the surgery. I wouldn’t be writing this if I didn’t, but I have all sorts of physical problems that are directly the result of my brain damage…

My brain damage left me nearsighted in one eye and farsighted in the other, so my ugly glasses were all lopsided because my eyes were so lopsided. 

I got headaches because my eyes, are like, enemies, you know, like they used to be married to each other but now hate each other’s guts. 

And I started wearing glasses when I was three, so I ran around the rez looking like a three-year-old Indian grandpa

And, oh, I was skinny. I’d turn sideways and disappear.

But my hands and feet were huge. My feet were a size eleven in third grade! With my big feet and pencil body, I looked like a capital L walking down the road. 

And my skull was enormous.

Epic.



(Reblogged from realkidsgoodbooks)